Why I’m Returning to the (Owl’s) Nest (and hope you’ll join me!)

  Thumbs up for spring, Owl’s Nest, and local farmers!

Thumbs up for spring, Owl’s Nest, and local farmers!

I’m Lindsay, a DC resident and nonprofit consultant. I work on projects aimed at growing our local food economy. I can’t think of a farmer or local food business owner in the DMV who I’ve met that I haven’t been in absolute awe of.

The margins are generally low - sometimes terrible - but the passion and commitment is something else.

Last year, I signed up for Owl’s Nest Market-Style Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) share after 10 or 12 blissful years of shopping at any number of great farmers markets.

I’m not shy to say that I’m sticking with Liz when we have SO MANY INCREDIBLE FARMERS to buy local food from. Here’s why:

  • It doesn’t get any fresher unless you grow it yourself. When it’s produced this close to where you live, it’s fresh, tasty, and it lasts longer in the fridge if it has to sit a bit.
  • Delicious product grown with us and the environment in mind. Tender collards, sprouting broccoli: OMG.
  • It’s an incredible deal and flexible. If I miss a market here and there, it’s a long season and there’s plenty of time to use my market credit when I can.
  • Great customer and member experience. From staying connected during the pick-up to the weekly newsletter, Owl’s Nest is a great communicator. Also, when your CSA members will write blog posts for you, you’re doing something right!

And now, here’s a few wonky bits.

  • I can reliably talk to a farmer every week. If it’s not Liz, it’s one of her team. It’s helpful to be able to follow the experience of one farm throughout the season while talking and buying from plenty of others too.
  • Also, farmers receive a decreasing share of the food dollar yet they’re the reason why we eat. So are distributors who handle our food, but when there are also options like a CSA to buy direct and get great food, I’m going to do that too.
  • Finally, data from the U.S. Census of Agriculture shows that overall beginning farmers, female farmers, and farmers of color, make less money than their white male counterparts who comprise most of our country’s farmers. (This should not be interpreted to mean that these guys are striking it rich.)

I gladly spend my money with all kinds of farmers and hope you will too. But I’m mindful of the data. If my money can do its infinitesimal part in increasing farm success for a broader diversity of farmers, I’m contributing to broadening opportunity, understanding, appreciation, and success of agriculture as a whole. This is desperately needed.

Mostly I’m returning to Owl’s Nest because Liz is a great farmer and I know I’m making a smart investment in my health. Supporting our local economy and a young, female farmer’s business is an added bonus.

  I went home with armloads of Napa cabbage last summer. Along with Owl’s Nest turnips and radishes and expert assistance, I made this magnificent vessel of kimchi.

I went home with armloads of Napa cabbage last summer. Along with Owl’s Nest turnips and radishes and expert assistance, I made this magnificent vessel of kimchi.

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